A Taste of the Sprang Technique with Carol James

What’s sprang? It’s a technique, used since antiquity, for making garments such as hats, mittens, socks, scarves, vests, leggings and more

One of the basic ‘stitches’ in sprang is the interlinking stitch. This video includes images of some articles made using this stitch. The video introduces the interlinking stitch as a braid, worked without a frame, and begins by showing you how to organise the threads. Detailed instructions help you to make the braid, and offers ways to avoid mistakes. The work produces two mirror-image friendship bracelets.

There is evidence of this technique starting in the Bronze age. With the advent of the Industrial Revolution in the mid 1800s, sprang almost completely disappeared in Europe and North America. It’s time to reawaken this amazing method.

Your video is loading

For this class you will need 2 colors of yarn, 2 sticks, tape, and scissors.

Other resources:

This class has not yet received enough ratings to calculate an average rating

Customer reviews:

This is a wonderful introduction to the fiber technique of Sprang.  As a fiber arts teacher, I am always looking for new and interesting ways to engage my students.    I love the fact that it can be so low cost to get started.  Carol's teaching style is perfect for learning.  Can't wait to get started, learn and share to keep this technique alive.  .  
By  Robyn Becker  on  Jun 15 2019 11:42 AM
This is a great introduction to the Sprang weaving technique. Carol has an engaging, light-hearted manner and her explanations are clear. She also foresees and answers possible questions. With this video, you can try it out and have a finished product, a simple bracelet, with materials you have around the house. I suggest you use smooth yarns for the bracelet. (I used a sticky Shetland yarn, which worked, but not as easily as a smooth yarn would have. Also, the sticky yarn prevented me from being able to make the mirror image bracelet since the yarns didn't travel smoothly to the bottom half of my yarns.) Carol also shows examples of projects that can be made using more advanced sprang methods, some historical and some that she has created. She has a more in-depth beginner video should you wish to pursue this further. 
By  Moni  on  May 06 2019 14:59 PM
It was presented well. Good photographing and the speaker made the directions clear. I would be interested in the class. 
By  Woolworker  on  Mar 06 2018 20:34 PM
This was the easiest to understand introduction to Sprang! I wasn't sure how interested I was in this technique but after seeing this I am excited to learn more. 
By  Linda G. Mesavage  on  Dec 13 2017 17:59 PM